RSS

Monthly Archives: September 2011

INTERGRATE LESSON WITH ICTS ON SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING PLATFORMS-PAPER ON POLICY IMPLEMENTATION IN AFRICA/KENYA EDUCATION SECTOR

INTERGRATE  LESSON  WITH ICTS ON SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING PLATFORMS-PAPER ON POLICY IMPLEMENTATION IN AFRICA/KENYA EDUCATION SECTOR

An ICT integration plan provides a detailed blueprint of the steps and methods needed
to translate the school ICT vision into reality. Developing ICT integration plans is no doubt a
complex and time-consuming task, but they are usually well worth the time required to put them
together.

Integrating ICT into teaching and learning is not a new concept. It may be as old as other technologies such as radios or televisions. However, with the rapid development of emerging technology, such as web technology, ICT integration has increasingly attracted the attention of educators. In this section, we will elaborate on the terms of ICT and integration separately before giving the definition of ICT integration.

Research has indicated that the use of ICT can support new instructional approaches and make hard-to-implement instructional methods such as simulation or cooperative learning more feasible. Moreover, educators commonly agree that ICT has the potential to improve student learning outcomes and effectiveness if it is used properly and cost effective methodology is implemented on the infrastructure platform(read shared resource computing).

Integration has a sense of completeness or wholeness by which all essential elements of a system are seamlessly combined together to make a whole. In education, simply handing out to students a collection of websites or CD-ROM programs is certainly not ICT integration. In a properly crafted ICT integrated lesson, ICT and other crucial educational components such as content and pedagogy are molded into one entity. As a result, the quality of the lesson would somehow be diminished if the ICT ingredient were taken away from the ICT-integrated lesson.

ICT integration in this paper is broadly defined as a process of using any ICT (including information resources on the web, multimedia programs in CD-ROMs, learning objects, or other tools) to enhance student learning. It is more of a process rather than a product.

Effective ICT integration into the learning process has the potential to engage learners. For instance, using multimedia to present authentic and ill-structured problems in problem-based learning can motivate and challenge students and hence develop their problem-solving skills. ICT can support various types of interaction: learner-content, learner-learner, learner-teacher, and learner-interface .These types of interaction make the learning process more interactive and learners more active and engaged.

In order to address the problem and achieve the learning objectives, teacher-designers need to carefully compare all
possible technologies that can be used for learning this topic. The technologies in this model may include software
such as multimedia courseware, web-based resources, communication tools (such as voice chat, textual discussion
forums, or video conferencing), mind tools (such as concept mapping tools and multimedia authoring tools), or any
other possible ICT tools.

Cost plays a significant role hence the need to automate using cost effective hardware solutions that allow users share PCs.
Shared resource computing solution providers like Thinglobal play an important role in enabling low cost VDI implementations especially in EMEA .

Both Education sector and community based project implementers continue to applaud Thinglobal for their solutions which has enabled entry level computing at less than 10 dollars per seat.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 29, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

DIGITAL CENTRES/COMMUNITY CENTRES FOR RURAL KENYA/AFRICA

DIGITAL CENTRES/COMMUNITY CENTRES FOR RURAL KENYA/AFRICA

The Centres will act as Community based centres and provide other agency services that include M-pesa centres,Cyber cafe services and learning e-health learning centres,E-learning centres provide other services that include phone charging services.

Solar driven the Centres will provide these services in the most of rural area where access to electricity is not guaranteed.

Driven by the lower power shared resource computing solution .1 computer can power upto 10 devices which use minimal electricity 4 watts of power.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 20, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

AS ELECTRICTY USAGE COSTS RISE KENYA /Africa ‘SET FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY BOOM ‘(SOLAR)-CASTOR POLLUX BRACES

AS ELECTRICTY USAGE COSTS RISE  KENYA /Africa ‘SET FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY BOOM ‘(SOLAR)-CASTOR POLLUX BRACES

Investment in renewable power in Africa is set to grow from a total of US$3.6-billion in 2010 to $57-billion by 2020, accompanied by huge foreign direct investment in energy infrastructure.
This is one of the findings of Frost & Sullivan’s study “Mega Trends in Africa: A bright vision for the growing continent”, which is due to be released at an African growth, innovation and leadership .
“Although Africa is endowed with fossil and renewable energy resources, which could more than adequately cover its energy needs, it remains the most poorly electrified continent in the world,” Frost & Sullivan said in a statement on Wednesday.
“The proportion of people without electricity in Africa is higher than anywhere else on the planet, with as little as 5% of the population having direct access to electricity in some countries.
Wind, solar, geothermal
“This significant challenge does, however, have a massive potential upside. The need to provide electrification to remote communities is one of the key drivers of renewable energy development on the continent.”
Frost & Sullivan analyst Ross Bruton said that investment in renewable power in Africa, which totalled a mere $3.6-billion by 2010, “is expected to grow to $57.72-billion by 2020.
“The key growth sectors will be wind power, solar power, geothermal power and foreign direct investment (FDI) into energy and power infrastructure.”
According to the consultancy, the development of Africa’s renewable energy sector will lead to greater diversification of the continent’s energy mix, decreased dependency on any one feedstock, and greater security of supply.
New technologies
New investments in the continent’s electricity infrastructure are also likely to incorporate new, “smart” technologies and standards, which will see information and communication technology (ICT) development taking place alongside electrification.
“Smart electricity development in Africa will be driven through grid incorporation of renewable power, and technological leapfrogging through investments into greenfield transmission and distribution infrastructure projects,” Bruton said.
“Smart grids are, however, only expected to play a significant role in key high-growth African economies.”
Over the next 10 years, Frost & Sullivan predicts, African renewable energy initiatives will be dominated by wind power projects, such as the Ashegoda Wind Farm in Ethiopia and Tanzania’s Singida Wind Farm.
Solar power will also show good growth, “although this will most likely be through South Africa’s Upington solar project and renewed interest in Desertec in North Africa

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 20, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

WHY SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING WILL SAVE 100 MILLION DOLLARS OF E-WASTE IN AFRICA

WHY SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING WILL SAVE 100 MILLION DOLLARS OF E-WASTE IN AFRICA

In recent decades, the use of electronic and electrical devices has increased significantly,leading to rapidly rising amounts of waste electrical and electronic equipment(WEEE), often also called e-waste, throughout the world. E-waste is a highly complex waste stream as it contains both very scarce and valuable as well as very toxic components.1 It also lacks a uniform international definition. In this article, we have chosen to use the terms WEEE and e-waste interchangeably. According to the definition put forth by the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) Initiative.
Over the last few decades, Kenya, along with other Asian and African countries, has become a major destination for e-waste exports from OECD countries. In addition, Kenyans have been generating rapidly increasing amounts of e-waste domestically. As of September 2010, there was no comprehensive regulation in effect covering the
management, recycling and disposal of e-waste in Kenya and the import of WEEE into the country. Consequently, much of the domestic and imported WEEE ended up in illegal dismantling and recycling facilities where workers use processes hazardous to both their health and the environment. The new draft E-waste (Management and
Handling) Rules, hereafter “draft rules” or simply “the draft”, are expected to come into effect by the end of 2010. The draft rules aim to address both domestic e-waste management and the import of e-waste into Kenya.
This document focuses on how the problems surrounding e-waste regulation in other countries – particularly those that export to Kenya – may influence or predict potential points of success as well as obstacles to the effectiveness of Indian regulation.
I use the examples of WEEE management regulation and enforcement in two of the world’s largest e-waste producers and the two biggest exporters of e-waste to Kenya, the United States of America (US) and the China. These examples are useful for two reasons: firstly, obstacles encountered in implementing and enforcing e-waste regulation in the China and the US may contain important lessons for the implementation and enforcement of such regulation elsewhere – including the draft e-waste rules in Kenya. Secondly, examining existing e-waste regulation and enforcement in these entities can reveal whether or China and the US can be expected to stop or decrease exports to Kenya. Both entities possess the technology to treat their own e-waste – so the questions of why and how some of this WEEE ends up in Kenya and which laws the China and the US have to regulate these exports are relevant to assessing whether or not the Kenyan regulation will be able to lessen the e-waste problem. If China and the US are unable to stop their own WEEE from being exported, Kenya will continue to carry a double burden in e-waste management, having to address the handling of both the country’s own domestic e-waste and the imports.
Hence the need to focus on other green technologies that include shared resource computing which will save the continent and particularly Kenya both in health and dumping to the tune of millions of dollars.
ThinGlobal has focused her foot-print in Africa after considering the need for more ICT requirement in Africa and the need to go green.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 9, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING SOLUTION FOR SCHOOLS IN GHANA AND KENYA FROM THINGLOBAL

SHARED RESOURCE COMPUTING SOLUTION FOR SCHOOLS IN GHANA AND KENYA FROM THINGLOBAL

SRC can multiply the number of student workstations available at a much lower price point than individual desktops, laptops or netbooks. The total cost of ownership (TCO) is lowered by deploying fewer fully configured computers and by reduced workstation support liabilities.

Like other SRC products, the Windows MultiPoint Server offering is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Microsoft’s anticipated deployment is in classrooms, computer laboratories and libraries, and does not replace fully configured or mobile PCs. The ease of set-up and management capabilities are promising features for classrooms, labs and libraries.

Empowering teachers to manage (or customize) the classroom environment without needing or relying on technical assistance will likely facilitate tighter alignment of computing resources with instructional strategies.

Unlike other SRC products, MultiPoint Server solutions can be supported by Microsoft or its authorized partners and include system licensing for the host and satellite computers.

Return to Top

Recommendations

School district CIOs:

Review the deployment of classroom computing resources now to see in which areas you might take advantage of SRC technologies. Keep in mind that this is a technology best suited for classrooms, laboratories and libraries where computers can be physically connected.
Prepare a TCO analysis of your current user workstation environment to both understand your current costs and to determine if you can make a business case for SRC technology. A TCO analysis provides good budgeting information regardless of a decision to deploy SRC technology.
Review software licensing arrangements to ensure compliance with the terms and conditions with respect to the potential for software sharing by multiple host computers.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 8, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

If We Could Bring You Back Again

If we could bring you back again,
For one more hour or day,
We’d express all our unspoken love;
We’d have countless things to say.
If we could bring you back again,
We’d say we treasured you,
And that your presence in our lives
Meant more than we ever knew.
If we could bring you back again,
To tell you what we should,
You’d know how much we miss you now,
And if we could, we would.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 2, 2011 in Uncategorized